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Arlington Vision 2020 Committee/Mass. Climate Action Network (MCAN) Chapter

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This page includes content from the Climate Change News blog, which is maintained daily by David Landskov, and content from our old SA blog archives.

  • Added Arctic Data Shows Global Warming Didn't Pause

    Climate Change News Nov 21, 2017 | 06:45 am

    Added Arctic Data Shows Global Warming Didn't Pause Improved datasets show that Arctic warmed six times faster than the global average during 'global warming hiatus'. Gaps in Arctic temperature data caused a misperception that global warming slowed from 1998 to 2012, according to a new study in the journal Nature Climate Change. A University of Alaska Fairbanks professor and his colleagues in China built the first data set of surface temperatures from across the world that significantly improves representation of the Arctic during the "global warming hiatus." Xiangdong Zhang, an atmospheric scientist with UAF's International Arctic Research Center, said he collaborated with colleagues at Tsinghua University in Beijing and Chinese agencies studying Arctic warming to analyze temperature data collected from buoys drifting in the Arctic Ocean. "We recalculated the average global temperatures from 1998-2012 and found that the rate of global warming had continued to rise at 0.112C per decade instead of slowing down to 0.05C per decade as previously thought," said Zhang who is also a professor with UAF's College of Natural Science and Mathematics. Zhang said their new estimates showed that the Arctic warmed more than six times the global average during that time period. Read more at Added Arctic Data Shows Global Warming Didn't Pause

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  • Growth in Global Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expected to Slow

    Climate Change News Nov 21, 2017 | 06:00 am

    Growth in Global Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expected to Slow EIA projects that growth in global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from energy-related sources will slow despite increasing energy consumption.  EIA’s International Energy Outlook 2017 (IEO2017) Reference case projects that energy-related CO2 emissions will grow 0.6% per year from 2015 to 2040, a slower rate of growth than the 1.8% per year experienced from 1990 to 2015.  Emissions from countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) account for all of EIA’s projected growth in energy-related CO2 emissions. Energy-related CO2 emissions from non-OECD countries exceeded those from the OECD countries in 2005.  The IEO2017 Reference case projects that energy-related CO2 emissions from non-OECD countries will grow 0.9% per year from 2015–2040, which is much lower than the 3.2% per year average growth rate from 1990 to 2015. EIA expects non-OECD countries to experience a 1.4% per year rate of increase in annual energy consumption from 2015 through 2040.  The overall population in non-OECD countries is projected to grow more than twice as fast as that of OECD member countries, and the demand growth for energy services such as air conditioning, home electronics, and personal vehicles increases with rising incomes. Some of the CO2 emissions related to increasing non-OECD energy demand are likely to be mitigated by changes in the fuel mix, similar to trends seen in the OECD countries.  In 2015, renewable energy and nuclear power accounted for 14% of non-OECD countries’ energy consumption.  By 2040 the IEO2017 projects that percentage to increase to 21%.  EIA expects coal demand[…]

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  • Hydrological Implications of Rapid Global Warming

    Climate Change News Nov 21, 2017 | 05:15 am

    Hydrological Implications of Rapid Global Warming Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events.  The findings indicate some of the likely implications should current trends of rising carbon dioxide and global warming continue. It follows much discussion on the nature of global change in a warmer 21st Century at the COP23 Climate Negotiations in Bonn last week. The new research, submitted to Climate of the Past Discussions, led by a team at the University of Birmingham, and involving multiple UK institutions and the British Geological Survey, sought to address this question using records from a major warming event in the Earth's past. The rapid global warming event, ~56 million years ago, known as the "Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum" or PETM has provided such insights. Read more at Hydrological Implications of Rapid Global Warming

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  •   Monday, Nov 20

    Climate Change News Nov 21, 2017 | 04:50 am

      Monday, Nov 20

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  • As Oceans Warm, the World’s Kelp Forests Begin to Disappear

    Climate Change News Nov 20, 2017 | 17:33 pm

    As Oceans Warm, the World’s Kelp Forests Begin to Disappear Kelp forests — luxuriant coastal ecosystems that are home to a wide variety of marine biodiversity — are being wiped out from Tasmania to California, replaced by sea urchin barrens that are nearly devoid of life. A steady increase in ocean temperatures — nearly 3 degrees Fahrenheit in recent decades — was all it took to doom the once-luxuriant giant kelp forests of eastern Australia and Tasmania:  Thick canopies that once covered much of the region’s coastal sea surface have wilted in intolerably warm and nutrient-poor water.  Then, a warm-water sea urchin species moved in.  Voracious grazers, the invaders have mowed down much of the remaining vegetation and, over vast areas, have formed what scientists call urchin barrens, bleak marine environments largely devoid of life. Today, more than 95 percent of eastern Tasmania’s kelp forests — luxuriant marine environments that provide food and shelter for species at all levels of the food web — are gone.  With the water still warming rapidly and the long-spine urchin spreading southward in the favorable conditions, researchers see little hope of saving the vanishing ecosystem.   “Our giant kelp forests are now a tiny fraction of their former glory,” says Craig Johnson, a researcher at the University of Tasmania’s Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies.  “This ecosystem used to be a major iconic feature of eastern Tasmania, and it no longer is.” The Tasmanian saga is just one of many examples of how climate change and other environmental shifts are driving worldwide losses of giant[…]

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  • Toon of the Week:  Climate Change, World Leaders and Mr. Trump

    Climate Change News Nov 20, 2017 | 05:50 am

    Toon of the Week:  Climate Change, World Leaders and Mr. Trump Read original at 2017 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #46

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  • Poster of the Week - Good Planets Are Hard to Find

    Climate Change News Nov 20, 2017 | 05:08 am

    Poster of the Week - Good Planets Are Hard to Find Read original at 2017 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #46

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  •   Sunday, Nov 19

    Climate Change News Nov 20, 2017 | 04:55 am

      Sunday, Nov 19

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  • Nuclear Power?  Are Renewables Enough?

    Climate Change News Nov 19, 2017 | 06:20 am

    Nuclear Power?  Are Renewables Enough? Nuclear Power?  Are Renewables Enough?  Michael Shellenberger/Jim Hansen press conference at COP-23 in Bonn, Germany on 8 November.  Click to view Nuclear Power?  Are Renewables Enough?   - youtube

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  • ‘Planet at a Crossroads’:  Climate Summit Makes Progress but Leaves Much to Do

    Climate Change News Nov 19, 2017 | 06:00 am

    ‘Planet at a Crossroads’:  Climate Summit Makes Progress but Leaves Much to Do The UN negotiations in Bonn lay the groundwork for implementing the landmark Paris deal, but tough decisions lay ahead. The world’s nations were confident they were making important progress in turning continued political commitment into real world action, as the global climate change summit in Bonn was drawing to a close on Friday. The UN talks were tasked with the vital, if unglamorous, task of converting the unprecedented global agreement sealed in Paris in 2015 from a symbolic moment into a set of rules by which nations can combine to defeat global warming.  Currently, the world is on track for at least 3C of global warming – a catastrophic outcome that would lead to severe impacts around the world....The Paris rulebook, which must be finalized by the end of 2018, now has a skeleton: a set of headings relating to how action on emissions is reported and monitored.  Nations have also fleshed this out with suggested detailed texts, but these are often contradictory and will need to be resolved next year.  “The worst outcome would have been to end up with empty pages, but that is not going to happen,” said a German negotiator.One issue that did flare up during talks was the action being taken by rich nations before the Paris deal kicks in in 2020.  Developing nations argued not enough is being done and, with the UN climate negotiations running largely on trust, the issue became unexpectedly serious before being defused by commitments to a “stocktake” of action in[…]

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