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This page includes content from the Climate Change News blog, which is maintained daily by David Landskov, and content from our old SA blog archives.

  • California Energy Commission Awards Nearly $70M to Replace Diesel School Buses with Electric School Buses Throughout State

    Climate Change News Jul 17, 2019 | 04:30 am

    California Energy Commission Awards Nearly $70M to Replace Diesel School Buses with Electric School Buses Throughout State The California Energy Commission approved nearly $70 million in funding to replace more than 200 old diesel school buses with all-electric buses that will reduce school children’s exposure to harmful emissions and help the state reach its climate and air quality goals.School buses are by far the safest way for kids to get to school.  But diesel-powered buses are not safe for kids’ developing lungs, which are particularly vulnerable to harmful air pollution.  Making the transition to electric school buses that don’t emit pollution provides children and their communities with cleaner air and numerous public health benefits. —Energy Commissioner Patty MonahanThe Energy Commission’s School Bus Replacement Program is providing more than $94 million to public school districts, county offices of education, and joint power authorities to help transition from diesel school buses to zero- or low-emissions vehicles.  Together with the newly approved funding, the Energy Commission has awarded $89.8 million of the program’s funds to schools in 26 California counties. The electric buses approved today will eliminate nearly 57,000 pounds of nitrogen oxides and nearly 550 pounds of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions annually. Diesel buses emit harmful pollutants, including fine particles that can lodge deep in the lungs and enter the bloodstream.  Because children’s lungs are still developing, and due to their faster breathing rate and other factors, children are more susceptible to the adverse health effects linked to air pollution including lung damage and asthma attacks.  Scientists have found that these fine particles can cause asthma in healthy[…]

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  • Days of Extreme Heat Will Become Weeks as Climate Warms, U.S. Study Warns

    Climate Change News Jul 17, 2019 | 04:00 am

    Days of Extreme Heat Will Become Weeks as Climate Warms, U.S. Study Warns Even regions of the U.S. where extreme heat and humidity have been rare should expect significant increases in the number of hot days by mid-century. Nearly every part of the United States will face a significant increase in extremely hot days by mid-century, even if some action is taken to reduce greenhouse emissions, a new study says.  If nothing is done to rein in climate change, it warns, the impact will be worse. Large parts of the Central and Eastern U.S. will get a taste of what that feels like over the coming days as a muggy heat wave settles in. The study, published in a peer-reviewed journal and as a longer report by the Union of Concerned Scientists, used 18 climate models to predict changes in the heat index—the mix of heat and humidity that reflects how hot it feels—across the contiguous U.S. as global temperatures rise over the coming decades.Read more at Days of Extreme Heat Will Become Weeks as Climate Warms, U.S. Study Warns

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  • Tuesday 17

    Climate Change News Jul 17, 2019 | 03:30 am

    Tuesday 17

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  • Toon of the Week - We're Slowly Being Cooked in a Pot!!!

    Climate Change News Jul 16, 2019 | 04:00 am

    Toon of the Week - We're Slowly Being Cooked in a Pot!!! 2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #28

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  • Monday 15

    Climate Change News Jul 16, 2019 | 03:50 am

    Monday 15

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  • Poster of the Week - May the Forest Be with You

    Climate Change News Jul 16, 2019 | 03:21 am

    Poster of the Week - May the Forest Be with You 2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #28

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  • Glacial Melting in Antarctica May Become Irreversible

    Climate Change News Jul 14, 2019 | 23:04 pm

    Glacial Melting in Antarctica May Become Irreversible Thwaites glacier is likely to thaw and trigger 50cm(1.6ft) sea level rise, US study suggests. An aerial view of Thwaites glacier, which shows growth of gaps between the ice and bedrock.Antarctica faces a tipping point where glacial melting will accelerate and become irreversible even if global heating eases, research suggests. A NASA-funded study found instability in the Thwaites glacier meant there would probably come a point when it was impossible to stop it flowing into the sea and triggering a 50cm sea level rise.  Other Antarctic glaciers were likely to be similarly unstable. Read more at Glacial Melting in Antarctica May Become Irreversible

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  • Public Clean Energy R&D Is Overlooked and Underfunded.

    Climate Change News Jul 14, 2019 | 22:43 pm

    The climate change policy with the most potential is the most neglected. The leading international body of climate change researchers released a major report [last] Sunday night on the impacts of global warming and what it would take to cap rising temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius, or 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit, above preindustrial levels — a goal that’s exceedingly difficult, but not impossible. The report is from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an international consortium of hundreds of climate researchers convened by the United Nations.  Authors presented their findings in Incheon, South Korea after a week of discussion. Why examine the prospects for limiting global warming to 1.5°C?  Because under the Paris agreement, countries agreed that the goal should be to limit warming to below 2°C by 2100, with a nice-to-have target of capping warming at 1.5°C. The report finds that it would take a massive global effort, far more aggressive than any we’ve seen to date, to keep warming in line with 1.5°C.  Without such effort, we will continue at our current trajectory toward 3°C of warming.  What’s more, even if we hit the 1.5°C goal, the planet will still face massive, devastating changes.  So it’s pretty grim. But the report is also a thunderous call to action, laying out what tools we have at our disposal (we have plenty) to mitigate global warming and to accelerate the turn toward cleaner energy.   Let’s walk through the basics. Read more at Public Clean Energy R&D Is Overlooked and Underfunded.

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  • Saturday 13

    Climate Change News Jul 14, 2019 | 22:32 pm

    Saturday 13

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  • Flood Risks from All Sides:  Barry's Triple Whammy in Louisiana

    Climate Change News Jul 13, 2019 | 04:33 am

    Flood Risks from All Sides:  Barry's Triple Whammy in Louisiana With climate change loading the dice for disaster, a storm fueled by warmer-than-normal Gulf water is headed for a Mississippi River already swollen with floodwater. The Gulf Coast is about to be pummeled by a three-punch combo:  Flooding from heavy rains over the winter and spring has been sending record floodwaters coursing down the Mississippi River, pushing the river close to the top of its protective levees in Louisiana.  Now a cyclone fueled by warm offshore waters is threatening downpours in the same area and a storm surge up the bayous at the river's mouth. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards warned residents this week to be prepared for flooding from two sides—both the Gulf of Mexico and the Mississippi River. It's the kind of compounding of risks that scientists have been warning about as the climate changes.  Climate change has loaded the dice for this kind of coincidence, scientists say. It was the water, rather than the wind, that was causing the most intense concern as Tropical Storm Barry gained strength and disaster declarations and evacuations began. Like Hurricane Florence in North Carolina last year and the remnants of Hurricane Harvey, which sat over Houston for days in 2017, Barry was moving slowly, creating a threat of days of heavy rainfall and flooding on the coast and lower Mississippi Valley, the National Hurricane Center wrote on Friday. In Louisiana's rivers, with water levels already high, Barry's expected storm surge of 3 feet or more would push the water even higher. Read[…]

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